I have been slowly working my way through another 30 day journal project from the wonderful Lisa Sonora. I have received some wonderful feedback from other artists online, and so in the spirit of paying it forward I am offering a free download of one of the images from this series. I will be loading other similar images into my Fine Art America account as I scan and edit them, in case you loved one of the others and would like to purchase one.


To get a FREE printable jpeg or pdf of this image fill out this form and I will email you the file. Feel free to share!



one step too far?

It’s okay, relax, this is not a political post! Instead it is about the scroll from my last post, the one I didn’t think was quite finished. 

Friday night I decided to revisit it. I had a couple of pieces of dyed and printed paper that I didn’t use, so I thought I would try giving one of them the monigami treatment. One of the things I felt wasn’t working was how stiff and heavy the paper was. So I gently kneaded the test strip with some oil, and it softened up beautifully. Additionally the organic dye (onion skins) moved around a bit creating a mellow background tone, but the monoprint pretty much remained the same. I loved how this piece looked, so I decided to go for it and do the whole scroll.

I’m going to blame my next decision on the fact it was late on a Friday after a really busy week, but truth is I could have made this awful choice any time. I decided not to take the scroll apart. This was crazy thinking. Although the paper was quite stiff and heavy, the areas that had been folded in the dye bath were seriously compromised, add to that the size of the scroll, and disaster number one happened. As I worked the paper it tore badly in many places.

Those of you who know my work will no doubt be saying, but you love torn things you can mend, and this is true, BUT, the oiling also seemed to have obliterated the really delicate monoprinted images. It was ruined. 

Saturday I hung it out on my washing line to see if evaporating some of the oil would help. My poor neighbors never know what they might see hanging out there.

When I brought it back in later that day it still looked awful.

Yesterday I decided I would try one last thing to try and save it. I took the scroll apart, and gently ironed each piece of paper between clean sheets of absorbent paper with a very hot iron to try and pull the excess oil out. It was tedious and now my studio smells like a chip shop, but I think it might have saved the day.

As I removed the oil the printing began to re-emerge! I was afraid the all the extra texture added in the monigami process would still hide the more delicate printed images, but I think enough is still there.

So now all I have to do is repair all the tears caused by being too lazy to take the scroll apart at the beginning and then sew it all back together again. 

Lesson learned. Long thread, lazy girl.


The beginning of the school year has been brutal. I just can’t seem to get into a rhythm. Perhaps I am too distracted by the unfinished work for my upcoming show. I am slowly figuring some things out in the studio but as of right now the work still feels strained. It has lyrical moments, but now the deadline is creeping up on me and I feel like I am forcing things. Here are some partially resolved struggles. Your thoughts are always welcome.

another summer ends

Its grey and raining here today.

It perfectly suits my mood, I’m a little sad and grey myself.

Suddenly summer is over. Technically it has been over for me for a week. Classes started back up at both schools where I teach last Tuesday, but it has felt like summer because my sister and Mum were here visiting after the wedding. We had a lot of fun playing tourist in my backyard, visiting parks and museums and just spending precious time as a family. Yesterday they went home.

It is beyond words, living so far away from them all, my parents and sisters, their spouses and children. I am incredibly lucky in my life here, I have the love of a really good man, and my children, and my grandchild. I have a beautiful home. I have meaningful work. I have friends. Somedays though I am still sad to be so far away from the place that will always be my home.

Life goes on. My work calls to me. Life has laundry and dishes and papers to mark.

And I can look forward to a less grey day, next summer, when hopefully the entire family will be back together again, even if it is only for a few brief glorious summer days.


Recently I was invited to join a group of artists from various disciplines working with kozo. Needless to say I was thrilled. About a week ago we met to cook the fibres and start cleaning and beating. This sort of work is always more fun in a group, and especially if there are snacks and drinks! We took turns working and so there was plenty of time for socializing. One of the artists wanted to try spinning the cooked but unbeaten fibre, which she was able to do! Amazing! This meant at the end of the session there was a piece of cooked unbeaten fibre which had been pulled apart for her experiment. I rolled it up in my apron and yesterday when I went to make paper (and so needed my apron again) I discovered it again. 

What I found was a beautiful organic structure full of holes, and regular readers may already have an idea where this is going…. yes, holes = needlelace. So I sat down with a needle and thread. And produced this

I loved how the needlelace reflected the structure of the fibre, it was an interesting intersection of natural and man-made. I liked it so much I decided to press on. Next I tried a bright contrasting thread.

And then I unpicked it because it just felt all wrong. So I switched to another more organic/neutral colour, a cream and added more. Better. So I just kept on working.

I never thought of working with just the fibres, but I love how this looks. I think a bigger experiment may be in the near future.

Now I am in full-on summer mode and can barely keep track of what day it is, I find myself in a bit of a philosophical mood. This is partly prompted by the slow unfurling that happens when my hands are engaged in my craft, but this week it was also prompted by a friend who wrote about weeding her CV, and about ambition. I’m really happy (and a tiny bit envious) of anyone who has reached a point in their career where they need to weed out their professional accomplishments to make way for more important or prestigious achievements but it does rather give one pause and make you feel a bit, well, stalled, or in a rut.

On most days I am entirely happy in my little dominion. I get to spend most of my days making art, or teaching art, or doing other arty things. And this is the life of my dreams. It’s the life I have been steadily working towards all these years, and yet, well comparison is the thief of joy, and I do occasionally wonder what I am doing, and why, and if it will ever be important or have relevance to anyone but me. And if not, does that matter?

Luckily I don’t get much time to sit around and worry about these things. There is always more to do than will fit in a day which is a good thing for a worrier like me. 

I FINALLY had an idea for my upcoming show in November. It’s not a clever or particularly intellectual idea, but I decided to just follow it anyway because it is something I have wanted to do for a while. And I have a reasonable chance of finishing it by the end of October. I am putting my caryatids on the back burner because I realized I was trying to squash a big idea into a space and time frame too small for it. So I am going to do more research and take it more slowly.

In the meantime I have been walking in the woods and eco-dying everything in sight and making lots of paper. 

None of these are radical things, but they make me feel grounded and connected. I remind myself that my job is to show up and do the work. And then to let it go.